herb

Basilic

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Basilic

Large leaves with a spicy clove fragrance and flavor are perfect for pesto. Great in sauces, salads and meat dishes. White flowers are attractive in the herb garden, but are usually pinched off as buds form to promote high-quality leaves for cooking.

Cryptotaenia du Japon

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Japanese Parsley, Mitsuba

Delicious herb with mild flavors of celery and parsley. Leaves and stalks are excellent used fresh in salads or soups and added to vegetable dishes or stir fry in the last stages of cooking. For best flavor, avoid overcooking. Allow some reseeding for longevity in the garden.

Cerfeuil vivace

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Chervil

Aromatic foliage forms beautiful lacy mounds in the garden. Fresh leaves give a delicate anise flavor to salads, fish or chicken dishes and cheese sauces. Add in the last stages of cooking to preserve flavor. Remove flower buds to promote leaf growth, but leave a few flowers to reseed for next year.

Artemise

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Tarragon

Aromatic, flavorful leaves have the scent and taste of licorice and mint. Adds zest to butter and cheese sauces, chicken, veal and fish dishes, and vinegars. French tarragon is the most flavorful; plants grown from seed are often called Russian tarragon, and flavor is variable.

Basilic thaï

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Thai Basil

Large, aromatic leaves have an intense licorice-basil flavor excellent for Thai and Vietnamese cooking, as well as Italian dishes. Holds its flavor better than common basil when cooked at high heat or simmered. Late blooming plants produce higher yields without the need to pinch flower buds.

Fenouil doux

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Fennel

Aromatic, feathery foliage is an attractive filler in the herb or flower garden. Leaves, seeds and the stem or bulb add mild licorice flavor to food. Slice bulbs and fresh leaves into salads and vegetable dishes. Ripe seeds add zest to Italian sauces, baked goods and sausage.

Baume mélisse

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Baume mélisse

Intense, sweet lemon fragrance and flavor; fresh leaves are excellent in teas, as a salad herb or as a flavorful garnish in fruit cups. Dried leaves are good in potpourri or tea. Attractive plant for the herb or flower garden. Variegated and golden-leaved forms offer a bright contrast. Reseeds in the garden, so you'll have plenty to use and share--and keep in mind that periodic shearing and harvest will minimize excess seeding.
 

Thym d'Hiver

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Thym d'Hiver

Aromatic foliage has a strong peppery flavor that enhances bean dishes and complements strong-flavored game meats and pâté. Makes a good sood salt or pepper substitute, and may be used fresh or dry.. Periodic shearing encourages tender, flavorful new growth, and also keeps plants from becoming woody and less attractive with age. Harvest before the white to lilac flowers appear.
 

Angélique

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Angélique

A bold presence in the herb garden, with large, ball-shaped flower clusters on sturdy stalks. An ancient herb with many historical culinary uses and medicinal properties; as with all herbs, research before use. Angelica is a biennal plant, forming a mound of leaves its first year, and reaching its dramatic height in the second, and final, year of its life cycle. Allow some seed to mature and scatter where you want the next crop of plants to grow in your garden.
 

Sauge

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Sauge

Aromatic foliage and striking blue flower spikes make a showy addition to the herb or flower garden. Fresh or dried leaves add flavor to sausage, stuffing, salad and soup. Attractive in arrangements, fresh or dried. Can be grown indoors in winter.
 

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